11th February 2020 - - 0 comments
5 steps to inspire and lead

I go to a regular spinning class at my gym (a group cycling class with loud music).

There’s a man there called Rob who started chatting to me a few weeks ago about the stats for my workout. I’ve been spinning for years but I’ve never really monitored my metrics over time.

Rob shared a few tips and encouraging words, my interest was piqued but I wasn’t fully invested. It was quite a lot to remember and I was content knowing that I always work hard, feel challenged and enjoy the class. I started checking the screen here and there and paid maybe 25% more attention.

A couple of classes later he came over to my bike, acknowledged my efforts and asked how I was getting on. I was honest and said it’s interesting and I can see how monitoring the numbers can be motivating but I couldn’t tell him my average because I wasn’t paying that much attention. He asked a few questions about my training and together we figured out what I should be aiming for in each class as a minimum.

This felt a lot simpler and I was now 50% in, an interesting tipping point because when I actively engaged with this simplified strategy the next two classes I attended were A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! I felt inspired to work harder and more consistently throughout the session. I smashed that target!

In the following class I stopped by his bike on the way in, excited to tell him about my results! A high five later I asked how he was doing and he shared his metrics but made a comment about his age being a factor. I challenged him about that and could see him thinking and reflecting on how he might be limiting himself.

That class we both smashed our best!

All I know about Rob is that he’s this nice person in my class who knows a thing or two about spinning. I don’t know his job title, position or anything about his life but look at the impact he’s had on my training and mindset.

Leadership can happen anywhere. This is how Rob did it in 5 clear steps:

  1. He saw my potential and acknowledged my efforts.
  2. He shared his story, encouraged me and trained me.
  3. He checked in and realised what worked for him didn’t work for me. I needed something simpler so he worked with me to figure out what that was.  
  4. He regularly asks me questions to understand where I’m at and offers suggestions tailored to me.
  5. He’s always supportive without a hint of criticism.

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more you are a leader” — John Quincy Adams 

  • Notice the accountability, collaboration and consistency over time.
  • Rob has never told me I could or should do anything, he simply empowered me and I did the rest.
  • When you inspire someone, they will take the next steps independently, I now add my metrics to my calendar and ask questions to continue learning.
  • Consider how we’ve become a team in this process and as a result have both benefited and improved.
  • Can you pick up on the sensitivity and kindness?

I’ve always pushed myself in class and I wasn’t aware that I could go from good to great in just a few weeks. I don’t know what Rob saw in me that made him reach out but I’m so glad he did! He’s added so much to my training and made a familiar class feel new and exciting again.

Wherever you are now look around, do you see potential, is there someone you would like to help grow in some way?

 

Add a comment:

Name:

Email:

Comment:

Enter the characters in the image shown:

Get in Touch

Please complete the form below:

logo
logo
logo